Category Archives: Comics

“Marvel Announces Creative Team for America Chavez Solo Series”

America yes!

A little more than a month after Marvel announced a solo series for America Chavez at New York Comic Con, the company has finally revealed the series’ creative team.

As first reported by Refinery29, YA novelist Gabby Rivera (Juliet Takes a Breath) will write the series, while Joe Quinones (Howard the Duck) will serve as the series’ artist, and Maguerite Sauvage as cover artist. The new series will see the young hero face off against alien hordes and travel through different dimensions, while also trying to attend class on alternate Earths and make space for her personal life.

“America doesn’t know how powerful she is, but she’s gonna find out. And the powers she does have are going to be expanded upon and she’s going to learn how to control and develop them,” says Rivera of what readers can expect from the upcoing series. “Some of the really fun Marvel moments are gonna be when we bring in key players like Captain America and Storm. They are going to be able to help America on her journey. And teach her things about her powers or lead her along the way.”

Created by Joe Casey and Nick Dragotta, Chavez – a queer Latina raised in another dimension – first appeared in their 2011 seriesVengeance. Since then, she has taken on the mantle of Miss America from Madeline Joyce, and gone on to earn herself a loyal fan following.

“America has one of the most dedicated and enthusiastic fanbases out there, so we wanted to make sure we could deliver a solo series worthy of that devotion,” says editor Will Moss. “That’s why we’re so thrilled to welcome Gabby Rivera to the Marvel fold, as she’s got America’s voice down pat, plus she’s got a ton of surprising and fun ideas for the series. And combining that with the one-of-a-kind stylings of the great Joe Quinones? Well, we’re ready to deliver that solo series now…”

http://www.ew.com/article/2016/11/18/marvel-america-writer-gabby-rivera

 

“Marvel’s World of Wakanda Will Spotlight Women, on the Page and Behind It”

“The world of the Black Panther, the Marvel Comics hero who hails from the fictional African country of Wakanda, is about to get bigger. Marvel announced on Friday a companion series, World of Wakanda, which is to premiere in November.

And just like the current Black Panther series, which is written by Ta-Nehisi Coates, the author and a national correspondent for The Atlantic, the new comic will be written by newcomers to the industry: the feminist writerRoxane Gay and the poet Yona Harvey.

“My agent was not thrilled that I was taking on another project,” Ms. Gay said. But learning to write comics exercised different creative muscles, which she said she found exciting.

“It’s the most bizarre thing I’ve ever done, and I mean that in the best possible way,” she said.

Her story, written with Mr. Coates, will follow Ayo and Aneka, two lovers who are former members of the Dora Milaje, the Black Panther’s female security force. “The opportunity to write black women and queer black women into the Marvel universe, there’s no saying no to that,” she said.

The first issue of World of Wakanda will include a 10-page second story by Ms. Harvey about Zenzi, a female revolutionary who incited a riot in the first issue of the Black Panther series. Mr. Coates, who recruited both writers, said he thought it was important to have female voices help breathe life into these characters. “The women in Black Panther’s life are very, very important,” he said.

Mr. Coates recalled a conference about two years ago, where Ms. Gay read a zombie short story. “It was the most surprising, unexpected, coolest zombie story you ever want to see,” he said. “When we started thinking about writers, she popped up right away…”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/23/books/black-panther-marvel-comics-roxane-gay-ta-nehisi-coates-wakanda.html

“Marvel Announces New Miss America Chavez Series”

“From the “Meet Marvel @ NYCC” retailer panel at New York Comic Con, Marvel Comics announced America, a new series featuring Miss America Chavez.

Marvel teased the series with a cover image drawn by Jamie McKelvie, who is associated with Chavez from his time drawing in the pages of Young Avengers. The image features Miss America in a powerful pose, with a gold chain with a large “#1” pendant hanging from it.

Marvel Comics did not reveal who would be writing or illustrating the new series.

Miss America was created by Joe Casey and Nick Dragotta in the 2011 Marvel Comics limited series Vengeance. She joined the Young Avengers as part of the 2013 Young Avengers series by McKelvie and writer Kieron Gillen. She also appeared as part of the A-Force series during Secret Wars and is currently a member of the Ultimates in Al Ewing and Kenneth Rocafort’s ongoing The Ultimates series. Miss America will continue to be a part of the Ultimates as The Ultimates comes to its conclusion and Ultimates2 takes its place.

Miss America is a Latin-American character and a member of the LGBTQ community. She has proven to be incredibly powerful and is capable of crossing realities by punching star-shaped holes in the universe.

Miss America comes from a parallel, utopian dimensions. Her own parents sacrificed themselves to protect their universe from destruction. Feeling the need prove herself a hero, and realizing that her own universe no longer needed saving, Miss America struck out on her and eventually landed in the main Marvel Universe.”

http://comicbook.com/marvel/2016/10/07/marvel-teases-new-miss-america-chavez-series/

“Lynda Carter, Gal Gadot Reflect on 75 Years of Wonder Woman at the U.N.”

“Not one but two Wonder Women assembled at the United Nations on Friday, as the iconic superhero was named an honorary ambassador for the empowerment of women and girls.

Gal Gadot and Lynda Carter joined Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins and DC Entertainment president Diane Nelson at the U.N. for a special ceremony recognizing the 75-year-old superhero. As part of the U.N.’s sustainable development goal number five, which focuses on promoting gender equality, the U.N., DC, and Warner Bros. plan to use Wonder Woman’s image to raise awareness for gender-based issues around the world.

The U.N. ceremony marked the first joint public appearance of Gadot, who appeared in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and will star in next year’s Wonder Woman, and Carter, who starred in the long-running ‘70s TV show. Both women spoke at the ceremony about the longevity and cultural impact of Wonder Woman, who celebrates her 75th anniversary this year.

“In some magical and mystical way, there lies within each of us Wonder Woman,” Carter told the audience. “She is real. She lives and she breathes. I know this because she lives in me, and she lives in the stories that these women tell me, day in and day out. I see it in the letters and in the stories. I read it on social media. I see it in the tears that fall from the eyes of the women who say it saved them from some awful thing that they endured — because they saw that they could do something great.

The appointment of Wonder Woman comes as the U.N. is under increased scrutiny for its lack of female leadership. Earlier this year, current Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he would like to see a woman named as his successor, but former Portugal prime minister Antonio Guterres is set to succeed him instead…”

http://www.ew.com/article/2016/10/21/lynda-carter-gal-gadot-wonder-woman-united-nations-ambassador

“Novelist Walter Mosley Talks Luke Cage, Colorism, and Why Spider-Man Was the ‘First Black Superhero’”

“Whatever you think of Marvel’s Luke Cage, you can’t say it’s not literate. A bevy of books are either seen or name-checked throughout the latest Netflix superhero series, and one that gets a particularly bright place in the spotlight is Little Green, a novel by one of the most prolific and acclaimed living crime-fiction writers, Walter Mosley.

In the second episode, two of the leads debate the comparative merits of Mosley and fellow African-American crime novelist Donald Goines — and the one going to bat for Mosley is none other than the title character. As it turns out, the feeling of respect is mutual: Mosley is a longtime superhero-comics geek and grew up reading Luke’s initial comic-book adventures in the early 1970s. We caught up with the author to talk respectability politics, the thorny issue of colorism, and why he thinks Spider-Man was the first black superhero.

You were a big Marvel Comics fan growing up, right?
Listen, I bought Luke Cage No. 1 in the store. So, yes. I also bought X-Men No. 1 and ConanNo. 1. I didn’t quite get Avengers No. 1 — but close.

X-Men No. 1 came out in 1963, so we’re talking the mid-’60s, here?
Way back. ’63, maybe ’62. I had been reading DC [Comics] before, but I gave up.

Why’d you give up on DC?
In DC, everybody looked alike. Everybody looked white. Marvel, way back in the beginning, had a black character, in Sgt. Fury, Gabe Jones. Everybody’s powers were so funnily designed that it didn’t feel real. Marvel had things I hadn’t even thought of, like hero-villains. You had somebody like the Sub-Mariner, who is a hero to his people, but an enemy to ours. Or the Hulk, who’s a pure being, but his emotions make him a villain or a threat. And you kinda go, Damn, that’s real…”

http://www.vulture.com/2016/10/walter-mosley-on-why-spider-man-is-black.html

 

“David Walker Talks POWER MAN & IRON FIST and the Return of Alex Wilder”

David Walker has been delivering great Power Man and Iron Fist stories that have a combined feeling of the early days of the characters with the current modern feel. We’ve seen some older and obscure villains pop up. Now, we’re about to see an unexpected foe for the Heroes for Hire — Alex Wilder.

Wilder was a great part of the Runaways…until he revealed his dark intentions. Not even death was enough to stop him as he is coming back to give Luke and Danny trouble. We got the chance to talk to Walker to find out more about what’s coming up.

Comic Vine: How far back does your love for Luke Cage and Danny Rand go?

David Walker: I was introduced to both characters when I was a kid, back in the 1970s, so this is a long term relationship. Luke and Danny officially became a team in the 50th issue of Power Man, which was retitled Power Man and Iron Fist, back in 1978. I bought. That issue on the newsstand. I was nine or ten at the time.

Comic Vine: How did you come up with Luke’s alternatives to cursing like “fiddle-faddle”?

There were multiple inspirations, the first being that I hate comics where characters are swearing but not really swearing. When someone says “crud” or “frack,” we know what they are saying, and to me, even as a kid, it sounded fake. I needed to come up with a way around that gimmick, and the fact that Luke is a dad was the perfect opportunity. All my friends with kids have problems with swearing in front of their kids, and everyone seems to have one of those swear jars, where you have to put money every time you drop a cuss word. I pulled all that together, and came up with the concept of Luke really struggling to not use profanity…”

http://comicvine.gamespot.com/articles/david-walker-talks-power-man-and-iron-fist-and-the/1100-156110/

“Wonder Woman at 75: How the Superhero Icon Inspired a Generation of Feminists”

“The first time Gal Gadot appeared on the set of “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” in her full Wonder Woman regalia — eagle-encrusted body armor, knee-high boots, and golden belt and bracelets, her raven hair swept back under a tiara — she was approached by a little girl.

“She wrote that she wished me luck and she was Wonder Woman’s No. 1 fan,” recalls Gadot. “I keep it with me.”

That encounter during last year’s production of “Batman v Superman,” which marked the movie debut of the decades-old female superhero, was a poignant reminder of Wonder Woman’s enduring prominence in the comic-book canon.

It also underscores the stakes that Gadot, Warner Bros., and DC Comics face as they ready the Amazonian princess’ first big-screen solo adventure. “Wonder Woman,” which hits theaters next June, is the first major feature film centered on a female superhero since 2005’s “Elektra.”

Thinking back to that first day on the “Batman v Superman” set, producer Deborah Snyder says she was so moved, she welled up.

“This girl and my daughter, who is now 5, will be able to have a female superhero as a role model,” says Snyder, also producer of the upcoming “Wonder Woman.” “They’ll have this strong character to look up to.”

The new film marks a seminal moment for a character who first hit the comic book landscape at the dawn of World War II, a time when society mandated that a woman’s place was in the home.

The re-emergence of Wonder Woman, who is celebrating her 75th anniversary this year, comes at a pivotal juncture, as Hollywood is consumed by a fierce debate over the lack of opportunities for women in top executive suites as well as in front of and behind the camera. Though men continue to outrank women on studio lots and are much more frequently employed on high-profile films, things are beginning to change.

Actresses such as Patricia Arquette and Jennifer Lawrence have been advocating to get paid the same rates as their male co-stars, and studios have made a commitment to hire more female directors. “Captain Marvel” will feature a strong female protagonist in Oscar-winning actress Brie Larson, with Lorene Scafaria, Jennifer Kent, and Niki Caro among the women being considered to direct. In a bid for gender equity among the blockbuster set, Disney has entrusted its $100 million-plus adaptation of “A Wrinkle in Time” to director Ava DuVernay…”

http://variety.com/2016/biz/news/wonder-woman-75th-anniversary-dc-comics-1201884289/